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Lithium-ion batteries made from recycled glass bottles store almost 4x more energy


A team of researchers at UC Riverside developed a low-cost way of turning disgarded glass bottles into lithium-ion batteries that store almost four times more energy and can last much longer than conventional batteries. This could mean significantly fewer charges for laptops, cell phones and electric cars, not to mention reducing waste.

UC Riverside, recycled glass bottles, lithium-ion batteries, recycled waste, Bourns College of Engineering, green technology, innovation, electric cars

The team, led by Cengiz Ozkan, professor of mechanical engineering, and Mihri Ozkan, professor of electrical engineering at UC Riverside, asked themselves whether silicon dioxide found in waste beverage bottles would be able to provide high purity silicon nanoparticles that can be subsequently used for lithium-ion batteries.

The three-step process of producing the anodes starts by crushing and grounding glass bottles into fine white powder, silicon dioxide is then converted into nanostructured silicon, followed by coating the silicon nanoparticles with carbon.

UC Riverside, recycled glass bottles, lithium-ion batteries, recycled waste, Bourns College of Engineering, green technology, innovation, electric cars

Related: 94-year-old inventor of lithium-ion cells develops new battery that can store 3 times more energy

According to lab test, coin cell batteries that were made using the glass bottle-based silicon anodes considerably outperformed conventional batteries and demonstrated excellent electrochemical performance. The team expect these high-performance batteries to not only extend the range of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and electric vehicles, but also provide extra power with fewer charges to laptops, cell phones, and other gadgets.

Photos via University of California, Riverside

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This article and images was originally posted on Inhabitat 

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