Rare Apple-1 Computer Sells at German Auction for $130,000


It’s not a Pro product unless you can solder your own capacitors onto it. This wouldn’t be happening if Woz was still here.

Pretty on point, actually. 😉 Jobs ideal was a computing device as an appliance, with no way to open it or change it. But he was constantly pushing for making great devices, constantly dissatisfied with what could be cobbled together with existing parts (so we benefit from him pushing his designers and engineers to try all sort of new things and invent new technologies). Woz was a hacker

*

extraordinaire, who could make simple parts do amazing things (the Apple II Disk Controller was a revolutionarily simple design that had many advantages over existing more complicated/expensive designs), and he encouraged others to do the same.

*

: (from back when hacker meant “adept at delving into existing systems, understanding how they work, modifying them to do new interesting stuff, and using the knowledge gained to make entirely new things” – sigh, someone broke into a computer, someone else commented that “a hacker did it”, and some reporter heard and either misunderstood or just intentionally misused the term because it sounded catchy, and now “hacker” means “computer criminal” to most people).

Interesting though, there are purportedly less than 60 in existence.

I thought I recalled the original production being in the neighborhood of 200, though I could be wrong.

$666-the price point devised by a couple of high California kids lol.

Devised by a couple of counter-culture revolutionaries, who found it entertaining and thought others of like mind would too. The competition at the time was CP/M running on S-100 bus 8080 systems (displaying on monochrome text-only terminals) that were really intended for business use. At the time, computers were basically only used by large companies – Steve & Steve had a dream of making computers that

everyone

could use (power to the people) – that was the revolution they were trying to foment. Indeed, Apple’s

follow-on

machine, the Apple II, was on the market months before the (monochrome-only) TRS-80 and Commodore PET, years before the Atari 400/800, and

many

years before the first IBM PC. At the time it kind of was revolutionary.

And, in some ways, the computer today that most closely matches Steve Jobs’ ideal, what he thought computers should be, is the iPad.

__

This article and images was originally posted on [MacRumors: Mac News and Rumors] May 20, 2017 at 10:26PM

by Tim Hardwick

 

 

 

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