Researchers ‘teleport’ a quantum gate

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According to (This article and its images were originally posted on Phys.org September 5, 2018 at 02:12PM.)

Network overview of the modular quantum architecture demonstrated in the new study. Credit: Yale University

Yale University researchers have demonstrated one of the key steps in building the architecture for modular quantum computers: the “teleportation” of a quantum gate between two qubits, on demand.

The findings appear online Sept. 5 in the journal Nature.

 

The key principle behind this new work is quantum teleportation, a unique feature of quantum mechanics that has previously been used to transmit unknown quantum states between two parties without physically sending the state itself. Using a theoretical protocol developed in the 1990s, Yale researchers experimentally demonstrated a quantum operation, or “gate,” without relying on any direct interaction. Such gates are necessary for quantum computation that relies on networks of separate quantum systems—an architecture that many researchers say can offset the errors that are inherent in quantum computing processors.

 

Through the Yale Quantum Institute, a Yale research team led by principal investigator Robert Schoelkopf and former graduate student Kevin Chou is investigating a modular approach to quantum computing. Modularity, which is found in everything from the organization of a biological cell to the network of engines in the latest SpaceX rocket, has proved to be a powerful strategy for building large, complex systems, the researchers say. A quantum modular architecture consists of a collection of modules that function as small quantum processors connected into a larger network.
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This article and its images were originally posted on [Phys.org] September 5, 2018 at 02:12PM. All credit to both the author and Phys.org | ESIST.T>G>S Recommended Articles Of The Day.

 

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