New discovery on T cell behavior has major implications for cancer immunotherapy


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According to (This article and its images were originally posted on Medical Xpress September 7, 2018 at 02:06PM.)

(Cover Image)

Scanning electron micrograph of a human T lymphocyte (also called a T cell) from the immune system of a healthy donor. Credit: NIAID

Scientists at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have discovered that disease-fighting T cells, elicited from vaccines, do not require glucose for their rapid reproduction, a finding with major implications for the development of immunotherapies for cancer patients.

In the study, published today in the journal Science Immunology, researchers from CU Anschutz, along with colleagues from the Mayo Clinic and the University of Pennsylvania, examined T cells that arose in the body’s immune system after they received a subunit vaccination—a that uses just part of a disease-causing virus.

They found that these critical , which attack and kill infection, did not rely on to fuel their rapid division which occurs every two to four hours. Instead, they used another cellular engine, the mitochondria, to support their expansion.

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This article and its images were originally posted on [Medical Xpress] September 7, 2018 at 02:06PM. All credit to both the author CU Anschutz Medical Campusand Medical Xpress | ESIST.T>G>S Recommended Articles Of The Day.

 

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