Juno mission captures images of volcanic plumes on Jupiter’s moon Io

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According to (This article and its images were originally posted on Latest Science News — ScienceDaily January 2, 2019 at 01:03PM.)

A team of space scientists has captured new images of a volcanic plume on Jupiter’s moon Io during the Juno mission’s 17th flyby of the gas giant. On Dec. 21, during winter solstice, four of Juno’s cameras captured images of the Jovian moon Io, the most volcanic body in our solar system. JunoCam, the Stellar Reference Unit (SRU), the Jovian Infrared Auroral Mapper (JIRAM) and the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVS) observed Io for over an hour, providing a glimpse of the moon’s polar regions as well as evidence of an active eruption.

“We knew we were breaking new ground with a multi-spectral campaign to view Io’s polar region, but no one expected we would get so lucky as to see an active volcanic plume shooting material off the moon’s surface,” said Scott Bolton, principal investigator of the Juno mission and an associate vice president of Southwest Research Institute’s Space Science and Engineering Division. “This is quite a New Year’s present showing us that Juno has the ability to clearly see plumes.”

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This article and images were originally posted on [Latest Science News — ScienceDaily] January 2, 2019 at 01:03PM. Credit to the original author and Latest Science News — ScienceDaily | ESIST.T>G>S Recommended Articles Of The Day.

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