The lies Comcast allegedly told customers to hide full cost of service

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According to (This article and its images were originally posted on Ars Technica January 3, 2019 at 01:36PM.)

(Cover Image)

Enlarge / A Comcast Service Vehicle in Indianapolis, Indiana, in March 2016.

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A new lawsuit filed against Comcast details an extensive list of lies the cable company allegedly told customers in order to hide the full cost of service.

Minnesota Attorney General Lori Swanson sued Comcast in Hennepin County District Court on December 21, seeking refunds for all customers who were harmed by Comcast’s alleged violations of the state’s Prevention of Consumer Fraud Act and Uniform Deceptive Trade Practices Act.

The complaint alleges, among other things, that Comcast reps falsely told customers that the company’s “Regional Sports Network (RSN)” and “Broadcast TV” fees were mandated by the government and not controlled by Comcast itself. These two fees, which are not included in Comcast’s advertised rates, have gone up steadily and now total $18.25 a month.

Comcast has responded to some lawsuits—including this one—by saying that the company had already stopped the practices that triggered the court actions. But Minnesota says that Comcast’s lies about the sports and broadcast fees continued into 2017, which is after Comcast knew about identical allegations raised in a separate class action complaint filed in 2016. (That case was settled out of court.)

Here’s what the Minnesota AG’s complaint says about how Comcast described the controversial fees to customers:

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This article and images were originally posted on [Ars Technica] January 3, 2019 at 01:36PM. Credit to the original author and Ars Technica | ESIST.T>G>S Recommended Articles Of The Day.

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