Fixing a flaw in photosynthesis could massively boost food production

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According to (This article and its images were originally posted on New Scientist January 3, 2019 at 02:18PM.)

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An efficiency boost might be on the way
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Intelligent design has triumphed where evolution has mostly failed. Biologists have boosted the biomass of tobacco by around 40 per cent by compensating for a fundamental flaw in photosynthesis.

The team is now working trying to introduce the same changes into food crops, starting with cowpeas and soybeans. “The funding agencies are really keen on getting this technology into the hands of the world’s poorest,” says team member Amanda Cavanagh at the University of Illinois in Urbana.

The key ingredients of life are molecules made of chains of carbon atoms. Plants assemble these chains from carbon atoms taken from the carbon dioxide molecules in the air.

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This article and images were originally posted on [New Scientist] January 3, 2019 at 02:18PM. Credit to the original author and New Scientist | ESIST.T>G>S Recommended Articles Of The Day.

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