Skull scans tell tale of how world’s first dogs caught their prey

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According to (This article and its images were originally posted on Latest Science News — ScienceDaily January 11, 2019 at 01:19PM.)

Analysis of the skulls of lions, wolves and hyenas has helped scientists uncover how prehistoric dogs hunted 40 million years ago.

A study has revealed that the first species of dog — called Hesperocyon gregarius — pounced on its prey in the same way that many species, including foxes and coyotes, do today.The findings also show that the largest dog species ever to live — known as Epicyon haydeni — hunted in a similar way. The animals — which lived from 16 until seven million years ago — could grow to the size of a grizzly bear.

Comparisons between computerised scans of fossils and modern animals have shed light on the hunting methods used by prehistoric members of a group of mammals known as carnivorans. These include modern-day foxes, wolves, cougars and leopards.

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This article and images were originally posted on [Latest Science News — ScienceDaily] January 11, 2019 at 01:19PM. Credit to the original author and Latest Science News — ScienceDaily | ESIST.T>G>S Recommended Articles Of The Day.

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