Check your compass: The magnetic north pole is on the move (Update)

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According to (This article and its images were originally posted on Phys.org February 4, 2019 at 04:30PM.)

(Cover Image)
In this July 23, 2017, file photo the midnight sun shines across sea ice along the Northwest Passage in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. The magnetic north pole is wandering about 34 miles (55 kilometers) a year. At the end of 2017 it crossed the international date line. That means it’s not even the same day at the new magnetic north pole as it is at the spot of 2010’s magnetic north pole. It’s leaving the Canadian Arctic on its way to Siberia. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)

Earth’s north magnetic pole has been drifting so fast in the last few decades that scientists say that past estimates are no longer accurate enough for precise navigation. On Monday, they released an update of where magnetic north really was, nearly a year ahead of schedule.

The magnetic north pole is wandering about 34 miles (55 kilometers) a year. It crossed the international date line in 2017, and is leaving the Canadian Arctic on its way to Siberia.

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This article and images were originally posted on [Phys.org] February 4, 2019 at 04:30PM. Credit to the original author and Phys.org | ESIST.T>G>S Recommended Articles Of The Day.

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